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Headlines from Archaeology Magazine

  • Possible Sons of Crusaders Identified in Medieval Burial Pit

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Apr 20, 2019 | 02:05 P

    Possible Sons of Crusaders Identified in Medieval Burial Pit CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND—According to a report in The Independent, a genetic study of remains recovered from a Crusader-era mass burial pit in what is now Lebanon indicates that even though some of the fighters were descendants of Western Europeans and local people who lived on the eastern Mediterranean coast, the Crusaders had little overall genetic impact on the population. The burial pit, located near the ruin of a Crusader castle in Sidon, contained the burned remains at least 25 individuals. The bones bear evidence of violent injuries and have been radiocarbon dated to the Crusader period, between A.D. 1025 and 1283.[…]

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  • Maya Figurine Workshop Discovered in Guatemala

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Apr 20, 2019 | 00:32 P

    Maya Figurine Workshop Discovered in Guatemala ROCK HILL, SOUTH CAROLINA—According to a Science Magazine report, a large figurine workshop dated to between A.D. 750 and 900 was discovered in the highlands of Guatemala during a construction project on private property. Archaeologist Brent Woodfill of Winthrop University excavated what was left of the site, named Aragón, and recovered thousands of ceramic fragments, including pieces of figurines and the molds used to make them. Such figurines are thought to have been given by Maya political leaders to their allies in order to strengthen and publicize political ties. The presence of the workshop suggests there may have been a[…]

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  • Rabbit Bone Dated to First Century A.D. Found in England

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Apr 19, 2019 | 02:03 P

    Rabbit Bone Dated to First Century A.D. Found in England WEST SUSSEX, ENGLAND—The Guardian reports that zooarchaeologist Fay Worley of Historic England spotted a small fragment of a rabbit’s tibia bone in a box of artifacts that were unearthed in 1964 at Fishbourne Palace in southeast England. This was the site of a Roman villa whose wealthy inhabitants are known to have kept a varied menagerie. Worley said the bone, dated to the first century A.D., bears no butchery marks and appears to have been part of the earliest known rabbit in England. Further analysis suggests the rabbit was kept in confinement, she added, and may have been an exotic[…]

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  • 13,500-Year-Old Burial Unearthed in China

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Apr 19, 2019 | 01:26 P

    GUANGZHOU, CHINA—Xinhua reports that a 13,500-year-old tomb at the site of the Qingtang ruins in southeastern China has yielded the remains of a young woman who died between the ages of 13 and 18 and was buried, without her head, in a squatting position. Liu Suoqiang of the Guangdong Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology said the woman was deliberately put in a squatting posture. “It points to the emergence of the concepts of life and death and of primitive religious beliefs,” Liu explained. Researchers are also trying to determine whether the woman’s head was missing due to natural causes,[…]

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  • Urine Salts in Soil May Mark Advent of Herding

    Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine Apr 19, 2019 | 01:04 P

    Urine Salts in Soil May Mark Advent of Herding NEW YORK, NEW YORK—According to a report in The Atlantic, Jordan Abell of Columbia University and his colleagues were able to detect a possible shift from hunting and gathering to herding at the site of Aşıklı Höyük, in Turkey’s central Anatolia region. Because the area is dry, Abell hypothesized that the sodium, nitrate, and chlorine salts contained in the urine of people and animals would not have been washed away from the soil by rain. The scientists analyzed soil samples from trash heaps, bricks, and hearths from different layers of the site, and found that between 10,000 and 9,700 years[…]

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